01 Jul

Cool New Technology Secures Open Hotspots

By TheRuckusRoom


Hotspots are just that.

People
everywhere now have an insatiable demand for constant connectivity. You’re
probably o
ne of those people.

That’s why public hotspots are
predicted to rise by 350% by 2015, and the number of private hotspots is expeced
to hit over 640 million (according to Informa Media and Telecoms).

While global public and private hotspots are exploding
so is identity theft, fraud and other criminal activities that can be made
possible through access to unencrypted confidential information.


So despite
this insatiable desire for connectivity, users are becoming more aware and
fearful that their communications at open hotspots could be compromised.



Most
businesses with a knowledgeable IT staff will take the time to secure their
internal wireless infrastructure with suitable encryption techniques. But most
public hotspots are not encrypted or protected in any way.



This means
that users are potentially vulnerable to attacks or confidentiality breaches.
This is also a major problem for enterprises with limited IT staff that want to
offer safer guest access but don’t have the time or expertise to implement
robust wireless security.

To provide a more secure hotspot experience
authentication (i.e., the user’s identity) and encryption (data scrambling) are
the two primary security items that should be addressed.

Security
at the transport layer (e.g. HTTPS) does help by encrypting transmissions
between the client and the destination server. However users want more assurances
at the link layer (layer 2) as traffic goes flying through the air.


Security at Today’s Hotspots

Hotspot2Traditional
approaches to link layer encryption require users to select an SSID and enter some
sort of shared encryption key or passphrase to scramble their data flying
through the air. Wi-Fi access at hotspots, your typical Starbucks or airport of
choice, is generally provided over an open SSID that is easy to find – requiring
users to simply accept general terms and conditions of use with no encryption
of …read more

Via: The Ruckus Room

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